The science behind intermittent fasting.

So I’ve told you about intermittent fasting, I’ve told you all about what it means and on today’s post I’m going to be giving you guys a quick run through on what SCIENCE says about intermittent fasting, how it works and more importantly why it benefits us.

So, intermittent fasting mostly follows the 16:8 periods. That is 16 hours of fasting and an 8 hour eating window. If you don’t know what that means, you can read all about it on my previous blog post by clicking here.

When a person intermittently fasts, they often eat within the 8 hour block leaving them with the 16 hours of eating (this is just generally the most common type of intermittent fasting – some may do shorter or longer periods). This sets them apart from people who do not intermittently fast because after around 10-12 hours, the following changes take place in our body;

  1. When you eat you usually store energy in the form of glycogen in your liver, however after 10-12 hours of fasting, your glycogen levels will be extremely low. In most cases this will mean you will not only start feeling hungry but also angry a term many of us know nowadays as HANGRY, but more importantly…
  2. With little glycogen left, fat cells in your body release fat into the bloodstream. The fat that has been released make it’s way to the liver to be converted into energy for use by the body and even more importantly for continuing healthy functioning of the brain, therefore, you are LITERALLY burning fat for energy.
  3. Blood samples show people who fasted between 12-24 had a 60% increase in energy from fat. With the biggest increase after 18 hours.
  4. This is the biggest benefit of intermittent fasting aside from exclusively fat loss, better cardiovascular health and lowered appetite. It is the benefit of KETOSIS.
  5. The process of burning fat for energy releases chemicals called KETONES.
  6. In the brain ketones trigger the release of an important molecule called BDNF.
  7. BDNF is responsible for helping build and strengthen neurones and neural connections in areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory.

So in a recap, intermittent fasting puts our body in ketosis, which benefits us in all kinds of numerous ways, moreover, you’ll find that although people start intermittent fasting as a method of weight loss, many adapt it as part of a lifestyle, due to the 101 other benefits of ketosis (I mean who doesn’t want to be smarter?!).

I have thoroughly studied ketosis from every angle and I will expand on the blog all about this process and why us humans were made for this practise. Why we have been using ketosis to survive for years and why it benefits us nowadays from helping to treat dementia patients to treating epilepsy in children to treating every day eczema. From tomorrow I am planning on starting my own intermittent fasts and recording them down not only on the blog over here for you but also in VLOG form over on the tube. If there’s anything specific you’d like to ask me about intermittent fasting, ketosis, or things you’d like me to note down, please drop me a comment and let me know. I can’t wait to start this and see from a personal view how it may positively and negatively affect day to day life.

Hoping for the best, until then, see you next time on the blog!

O X O X 

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